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Category: Employee Communications

Generating Results from Audience Segmentation

A simple way to add value to your audience segmentation efforts is to deliberately consider types of audience groups. While some audiences may be simply constructed as receivers of information, most often as communicators we impart a role to audience segments. For example, in an internal communications plan, we might identify Managers/Supervisors as an audience…

Capacity vs. Capability: What’s the Difference?

In the often buzz-word intensive field of change management, the terms “capacity building” and “capability building” are often used interchangeably. That is unfortunate, because a more careful treatment of the terms can actually lead to some useful breakthroughs for organizations working through change. Let’s take a closer look. In the context of transformation, “capacity building”…

Is your Communications Team in Trouble?

In my experience, communicators from various backgrounds and sectors share in an almost universal struggle to define the value they bring to organizations, and then communicate that value in a way that resonates with decision-making executives. This challenge comes up in three main forms: First, communications is often seen at best as overhead, and at worse,…

Managing Internal Client Relationships: The Importance of Strong Employee Communications

It often amazes me to see that amid the oceans of material written about strategic communications planning, virtually nothing is said about how communications advisors operate on their ‘home turf’, in relation to senior management and colleagues in program or policy shops. It’s a peculiar omission, because the way in which you approach internal client…

What’s the difference between public and private sector approaches to internal communications?

Does internal communication and engagement differ in the public sector from the private sector? I’d say unequivocally, yes. Here are two reasons why: 1. Resourcing Increasingly, private companies recognize that internal communication and employee engagement are foundational requirements for performance. Want to drive sales? Enhance customer focus? Innovate? All of these strategic business imperatives depend…

Developing a Community of Practice

More and more, we’ve found that many of our clients are exploring the idea of creating communities of practice in their organizations. With an emphasis on dialogue, sharing, and flexibility, these new groups provide more informal communications tools that help share information across traditional hierarchies. But what is a community of practice? A community of…

Employee Communication in a Time of Change: Views from the Trenches

Last week, I had the pleasure of moderating a panel on How Employee Engagement can Drive Organizational Change at the University of Ottawa’s Institute for Strategic Communications & Change. The session provided participants with expert insights and lessons from the trenches from the following distinguished panelists: • Renée Légaré, Executive Vice President & Chief Human…

A New Model for Employee Communications

Earlier this summer, I had the pleasure of attending Shel Holtz’s launch of a new Employee Communications Model in Washington D.C. As a long-standing fan of Shel’s work, I knew I was going to be in for a treat, and the session didn’t disappoint. In creating this framework, Shel has made a significant – and…

Is it Public Relations, or Communications?

Last week, I spotted this thought-provoking post by Gini Dietrich on her blog SpinSucks. In it, she tackles the question of defining public relations. I was intrigued by the piece, because I’ve noticed that PR is used in all kinds of different contexts, but there doesn’t seem to be an established shared meaning for the…

Internal Communications: Rumours of Its Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated

I have noticed a somewhat concerning trend lately among organizations who view social media as a handy alternative to the messy business of building and executing an internal communications function. The argument is that there’s no need to invest in a specialized internal communications function when all employees have to do is find information about…